The Southern Oral History Program: Rachel Seidman and Jaycie Vos

Rachel Seidman of the Southern Oral History Project
Rachel Seidman, Director, SOHP

The Southern Oral History Program (SOHP), founded in 1973, documents the stories of individuals across the American South with its extensive oral history collection. The histories are housed at the Southern History Collection at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, as part of the Center for the Study of the American South. Today, the SOHP provides an amazing opportunity for collaboration between historians, archivists, and researchers. Not only do they continue to gather important stories of the South, the SOHP also hosts a well-known podcast. Press Record — “a podcast about the joys and challenges of learning history by talking to those who lived it” — is an amazing resource for those of us continuing to learn how to conduct oral histories. The Nuevas Raíces: Voces de Carolina del Norte project is also a product of an SOHP collaboration with the Latino Migration Project and the UNC University Libraries.

Jaycie Vos, Coordinator of Collections, SOHP
Jaycie Vos, Coordinator of Collections, SOHP

[True] Stories was lucky to help bring historian Rachel Seidman and archivist Jaycie Vos to Davidson College for a discussion with students of Professor Kelly and Professor Christian Lamb’s Oral History course. We hope you enjoy this recording of their wonderful talk about oral history methods, Nuevas Raíces, and their experiences working for the Southern Oral History Project!

 

 

Using HistoryPin to Enhance Oral History Collections

mappinHistoryPin is a unique non-profit website designed to allow people to connect and share pieces of history by virtually pinning them to the HistoryPin map. For example, below is an 1890 photograph of Rollins College that was pinned to Winter Park, Florida by the Winter Park Public Library.

Rollins College, from the Winter Park Public Library via HistoryPin

Photographs, video, audio content can all be pinned to the map. Together, these can form incredible collections that tell the story of a place, pulling a single point out from a map and showing its passage through time.

Anyone can create an account with HistoryPin and start building their own collection. This is especially useful for those who are working on oral history projects that are tied to a specific location–for example, our students who are exploring topics related to their particular campuses.

To upload audio or video content, follow these steps (adapted from the HistoryPin FAQs

  1.  Upload your audio or video clip to YouTube
  2. Make sure your video is listed as public
  3. Click the “share” button under the video on YouTube. Check the “long link” box and copy the link.
  4. Log in or create a HistoryPin account
  5. Click ‘Pin’ and select ‘Video’ or ‘Audio’ and drop in the link
  6. Add a title, date, and location (the date and location can be approximate)
  7. Don’t forget to save!

Once material has been pinned to the map, descriptive content (what you may have heard us refer to as “metadata”) or narrative content can also be added. In fact, you can add descriptive or narrative content to anything on the HistoryPin map, even if you didn’t add it yourself. This creates a rich opportunity for people to increase the communal knowledge about particular places and digital objects–for example, you may find a photo or video on HistoryPin which you know more about than the person who originally added it!

pointingrightRemember: If you are posting content from an oral history interview, make sure you have permission from the person you interviewed before making their interview public. If you do have permission but don’t have a YouTube account, don’t forget that if you created content as part of a class participating in the [True] Stories Project, we are happy to post your interview to our YouTube channel. Just email janerogersfield@gmail.com for more information!

Oral History, Copyright, and Beyond: A Conversation with Dr. Jonathan Miller

We are happy to invite you to another [True] Stories speaker event:

JMimageOral History, Copyright, and Beyond: A Conversation with Dr. Jonathan Miller of Rollins College

Time:  Tuesday, April 19, 2016 10:00am EST/ 9:00am CT

Rollins College’s Library Director, Dr. Jonathan Miller, will lead us in a conversation about copyright as well as other ethical and practical considerations involved with oral history work.

Dr. Miller earned his PhD from the University of Pittsburgh in 2009 and wrote his dissertation on the role of librarians and libraries in the development of copyright law. His research and writing interests also include copyright history, open access publishing, and library management. In addition to his many publications, awards, and accomplishments, Dr. Miller is active in the Association of College & Research Libraries where he enjoys engaging in advocacy and government relations work. You can view Dr. Miller’s CV online here and a selection of his recent publications here.

Please join us and bring your questions! This event will also be recorded and an edited copy will be available afterwards on the [True] Stories website.

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://zoom.us/j/317692836

Or iPhone one-tap:  16465588656,317692836# or 14086380968,317692836#

Or Telephone:

Dial: +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll) or +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll)

Meeting ID: 317 692 836

International numbers available: https://zoom.us/zoomconference?m=K1McPKsaPYlgd4R-ycdhBpyEWuwQ7QHT

Listening in Interviews: A Journalist-Turned-Historian’s Perspective, Dr. Leslie Poole of Rollins College

Please join us for tomorrow’s [True] Stories speaker event:

Leslie_snipListening in Interviews: A Journalist-Turned-Historian’s Perspective, with Dr. Leslie Poole of Rollins College

Time: Thursday, April 14, 2016 at 2:00pm EST /1:00pm CT

Award-winning writer and historian, Dr. Leslie Poole, will lead a Rollins classroom talk for Dr. Anne Stone’s Listening Class, discussing the listening styles and interview strategies she cultivated as a journalist with deadlines, assignments, questionable sources, and a diverse readership base. She will also compare those approaches to methodologies used in traditional oral history work, a field she has become well versed in during her more recent years as a historian and professor at Rollins College.

Leslie’s talk will be followed by a classroom and chat room Q and A session, so join us and bring your questions! This event will also be recorded and an edited copy will be available afterwards on the [True] Stories website.

Join from a PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android here: https://zoom.us/j/438218836

Or Join by Telephone:

Dial: +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll) or +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll)

Meeting ID: 438 218 836

International numbers available here: https://zoom.us/zoomconference?m=LbAKPBwkQ-D9u7LoappRHtA27cZsGzJj