Reposted Blog Post 4

On September 22, 2016, I interviewed Scott Wilson, a physical therapist who has been working at Physiomed for sixteen years. Having the interview with Scott opened my eyes to different perspectives of a physical therapy career. I was amazed to hear from Scott that since high school he knew that he wanted to be a physical therapist and ruled out all other medical professions. Not many people can say that ever since grade school, they knew right off the bat they wanted to be in a specific profession and pursue it until finally going into that profession. I was surprised to hear how many concepts from class Scott talked about during the interview such as active listening and therapeutic listening. From his interview, I took away some key lessons that could help me in my future endeavors. I realized how important active listening is to patients when working on their treatments plans. Although many patients come see Scott on a daily basis, he mentioned how important it is to give ones full attention to what the patient is saying, and take the time to understand their points of view. He mentioned that an active listener is one who acknowledges the patient and is interactive (nonverbally and verbally) while a passive listener does the opposite. Furthermore, being able to communicate to the level of the patient is a critical point in a physical therapy profession because it allows the patient to understand what you know about their condition and how to go treatment. Scott couldn’t stress enough to me that its important to go beyond just simply treating the symptoms of the patient, but rather understand the patients “why” and be able to educate patients about their condition and how its affecting their activities of daily living. After our conversation with Scott, It inspired me to continue pursing a career in physical therapy. In the past summers, I did shadow for Scott at Physiomed so it was helpful to interview him and learn more about the profession. I was able to get on a deeper level with him and understand the responsibilities, and important characteristics of a successful physical therapist.

Although the interview was an enjoyable experience, Scott and I experienced couple barriers and challenges. The first one was that I had trouble scheduling a time to interview. With Scott’s busy schedule, it was hard to set a time and day that would work for him when he wasn’t with a client. We decided that the best time would be the weekend since he leaves middle of the day. Knowing Scott’s hectic lifestyle with work and his family, it is a challenge for him to find a couple minutes for lunch or dinner. He is always working and doesn’t have the time for himself during the week. The second barrier I found while interviewing Scott was when he was eating and talking to me simultaneously. I felt that some of the questions took him longer to respond to because I could hear him eating in the background and he was probably more focused on his food than the question. I was understanding of the circumstances and continued on with my question. This could be considered a physiological barrier since he was exhausted and he just wanted to rejuvenate himself. Although these barriers arose during the interview, it did not make Scott’s responses unimportant or less accurate. He took some time to think through some questions, but overall he responded thoroughly to them, and I learned a lot of useful information from him.

My overall interview experience was great, and I learned a lot of valuable advice on interacting with patients and what it takes to be an excellent physical therapist. I am continuing to learn about this inspiring profession everyday, and I hope to one day become as successful of a physical therapist as Scott.

blog post 4

On September 22, 2016, I interviewed Scott Wilson, a physical therapist who has been working at Physiomed for sixteen years. Having the interview with Scott opened my eyes to different perspectives of a physical therapy career. I was amazed to hear from Scott that since high school he knew that he wanted to be a physical therapist and ruled out all other medical professions. Not many people can say that ever since grade school, they knew right off the bat they wanted to be in a specific profession and pursue it until finally going into that profession. I was surprised to hear how many concepts from class Scott talked about during the interview such as active listening and therapeutic listening. From his interview, I took away some key lessons that could help me in my future endeavors. I realized how important active listening is to patients when working on their treatments plans. Although many patients come see Scott on a daily basis, he mentioned how important it is to give ones full attention to what the patient is saying, and take the time to understand their points of view. He mentioned that an active listener is one who acknowledges the patient and is interactive (nonverbally and verbally) while a passive listener does the opposite. Furthermore, being able to communicate to the level of the patient is a critical point in a physical therapy profession because it allows the patient to understand what you know about their condition and how to go treatment. Scott couldn’t stress enough to me that its important to go beyond just simply treating the symptoms of the patient, but rather understand the patients “why” and be able to educate patients about their condition and how its affecting their activities of daily living. After our conversation with Scott, It inspired me to continue pursing a career in physical therapy. In the past summers, I did shadow for Scott at Physiomed so it was helpful to interview him and learn more about the profession. I was able to get on a deeper level with him and understand the responsibilities, and important characteristics of a successful physical therapist.

Although the interview was an enjoyable experience, Scott and I experienced couple barriers and challenges. The first one was that I had trouble scheduling a time to interview. With Scott’s busy schedule, it was hard to set a time and day that would work for him when he wasn’t with a client. We decided that the best time would be the weekend since he leaves middle of the day. Knowing Scott’s hectic lifestyle with work and his family, it is a challenge for him to find a couple minutes for lunch or dinner. He is always working and doesn’t have the time for himself during the week. The second barrier I found while interviewing Scott was when he was eating and talking to me simultaneously. I felt that some of the questions took him longer to respond to because I could hear him eating in the background and he was probably more focused on his food than the question. I was understanding of the circumstances and continued on with my question. This could be considered a physiological barrier since he was exhausted and he just wanted to rejuvenate himself. Although these barriers arose during the interview, it did not make Scott’s responses unimportant or less accurate. He took some time to think through some questions, but overall he responded thoroughly to them, and I learned a lot of useful information from him.

My overall interview experience was great, and I learned a lot of valuable advice on interacting with patients and what it takes to be an excellent physical therapist. I am continuing to learn about this inspiring profession everyday, and I hope to one day become as successful of a physical therapist as Scott.

Interview Scott Wilson Physical Therapist (blog post 3)

My video is available here:  https://storycorps.me/interviews/interview-with-scott-wilson-physical-therapist-and-chiropractor-specialist-september-18-at-1150am-est/

Here is my Blog Post 1: ( I modified the questions a little so that they would concentrate more on listening and communication) http://social.rollins.edu/wpsites/truestories/2016/09/01/blog-post-1-julia-shelest/

Here is my Blog Post 2: http://social.rollins.edu/wpsites/truestories/2016/09/11/blog-post-2-julia-shelest/

My interview with Scott Wilson a physical therapist was better than I expected since I gave Scott the questions in advance so he would be prepared to answer them without much hesitation of what type of questions I would be asking. I was shocked at how much information that we read about in Listening Pays and Listening in Everyday Life he expanded on. His explanations gave me a much clearer understanding of the text and how it relates to my everyday activities, most importantly my future career as a physical therapist. First, I was amazed to find out that that since high school Scott always knew that he wanted to be a physical therapist and completely ruled out all the other medical professions. He knew right of the bat that he liked to work with his hands, and that he wanted to educate other people about how their body worked. As I think about me in high school, I did not know right away I wanted to be a physical therapist but I was always enjoyed helping others and tried to make them better.

As I was growing up, I experienced working at different health clinics. The internship I had with Scott directed me toward my passions and interests in physical therapy. I asked Scott the most important characteristics of his job and he mentioned that communication is key. Obviously he mentioned the anatomy and physiology part not changing and being important, but he said its even more important is to be able to communicate to the level of the patient so they could see what you know and can apply a proper treatment plan. He further expressed on how important it is to stay on top of things such as new new modalities because it gives the patience a way to see that the therapist is not only capable at doing his own daily activities but he is also “staying on top” of what is the best treatment/method. Scott mentioned this skill is not something that is often recognized quickly by patients and takes quiet a lot of work and time. Another skill that Scott kept mentioning is the importance of communication and listening. To go along with what he was saying I then asked Scott to define active listening. The two ways he defined them was either being a passive or active listener. He stated how a “passive listener is someone who sits back, takes all the information in” while an active listener is “someone who is acknowledged and interactive (nonverbally & verbally).”

From experience working at different clinics I saw a large variety of patients that were either passive or active, however, I discovered the patients that got the most out of their visit were the ones that asked questions, and didn’t just let the therapist do all the talking. They were involved in the conversation and also tried to understand why they were brought into the clinic, and how to reduce their pain. That being said he kept repeating that what makes an excellent physical therapist stand out over a good therapist is being able to understand the patients “why” and be able to educate patients on the what their condition is and how they can go about treating that condition.

Lastly, the best advice Scott left me with was how crucial my interview process is. I learned that I have to be ready for any questions that they ask of me during the interview process and try to answer it as if I am in the shoes of a physical therapist. As I am so passionate about this profession, I have to go beyond just simple answers to questions such as “I applied to be a physical therapist because I like working with people” but rather let the interviewer know how badly I want to give back to the community as a physical therapist and eventually mentoring students like myself to spread the word to other people. Scott obviously being in the business for 22 years has much more experience than me, but by learning and taking his advice as I go into the process of applying will only benefit me in the long run and with my future endeavors.

Three scholar sources:

  • 1 on Communication
  • 1 Responsibility & Problem solving
  • 1 on understanding health behavior of patients

1) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4413084/

2) http://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.rollins.edu:2048/ps/i.do?&id=GALE|A75085602&v=2.1&u=wint47629&it=r&p=STOM&sw=w&authCount=1

3) http://www.manualtherapyjournal.com/article/S1356-689X(16)30125-4/abstract

Blog Post 2 julia shelest

I am planning to interview a Physical Therapist who I used to shadow last semester at Physical Therapy works. Her name is Robyn Zuromski and she is a DPT. I shadowed her twice a week last semester and I think she would be the perfect candidate to interview. She earned her doctorate from University of Central Florida in 2015. She is a licensed physical therapist who has experience in four different clinical rotations. These include acute, subacute, and outpatient settings. As I was shadowing her last semester, I could see how much she loved what she does, it made me inspired by her work. She enjoys working with adults and geriatric population who have a variety of orthopedic and neuro diagnoses. As a young girl she always was active and did Yoga. With her dedication to Yoga she eventually incorporated Yoga into her life by having it in her physical therapy practices. She says it keeps her calm and by doing Yoga with some of her patients, it gives them a way to relax and get their mind of the illnesses and aches they have. For her yoga is a stress reliever and it  allows her mind not to wander. Lastly, she was always passionate for helping people and wanted to go into Physical Therapy for her career. The experience I had with Robyn last semester not only opened my eyes to a career in health, but I continued to learn how to work with patients on an individual level and what it takes to fulfill their needs. Most importantly, I think Listening is a major characteristic Robyn continually does on a daily basis. She has to listen attentively to what patients explain to her about their aches and then report back to them on what the patient told them. This often tells the patient that Robyn cares to hear about what they have to say without interruption and she makes the patient feel wanted and supported.

Blog Post 1 Julia Shelest

 

  • Please tell me about your health interests and what led you to a career in physical therapy?
  • Did you always know that you wanted to do a career in health or was someone a role model for you that you looked up to? If so, who?
  • What have you learned the most from the patients you see and what is the most difficult part of your job?
  • If you could list some things that you love most about your career what would they be?
  • As someone who is still in young and applying to physical therapy school, what is the best advice you wish someone told you when you were applying to Physical Therapy school?

As a young student interested in Physical Therapy meeting with a doctor in physical therapy is inspiring. By asking questions like the first question, I can learn what the person was like back when he was my age and what made him/her go into a profession in health. The second question is also a way for me to feel out my interests in the health profession and if the DPT program is a program that fits me. Also, he/she could give me insight into who I should look up to the most when I am in the process of applying to schools which could range from my family, friends, or even family friends. If I do end up going into physical therapy, I think its important to know what I will learn from the patients and how to overcome obstacles when I come across them with valuable advice (question 3). I strongly believe that when you choose a career it must be something that you love and have a passion for. I have always wanted to help others and make their world a better place so I think asking a question like number 4 would benefit me. As I am still young and in the process of applying to schools, I think listening to the best piece of advice from someone with experience could only help me in the long run by making me more confident, aware, and intelligent.