ThirdSight History

ThirdSight History

Photo map

thirdsight-map

Legend

Brown v board

Plessy v Ferguson

Inauguration of Obama

Killing of Emit Till

Murder of Trayvon Martin

Murder of Freddie Gray

Martin Luther king speech

Trump protests

Japanese internment

 

Segregation, and racism, has been a large issue in The United States since before 1896, when the Supreme Court sanctioned legal separation of races. It all started back when people realized there could be a difference in social class pertaining to, religion, background, and color. Blacks first became the main bottom of the social class in the USA because they were brought over to the Americas as slaves to do the biddings of the white men starting in the sixteen hundreds.  They didn’t start to move towards an unsegregated society until blacks were “freed” in the mid eighteen hundreds after the civil war was won by the north. Even after the civil war, when blacks started to migrate to the north for better laws, jobs, and life, the south continued to oppress minorities. In 1896 Plessy vs Ferguson was brought to the Supreme Court to rule whether racial segregation “Separate but equal” should be overturned, and instead It was kept with a strong majority of 7-1 voting in favor of keeping segregation. Thus, white Americans decided that it was alright to keep whites separate from other minorities, which slowed their development compared to whites. In order to keep whites separate from blacks, laws were created which divided the people through schools, drinking fountains, public transportation, and restrooms. The 1950s were a great example of how minorities fought to restore their rights of equality in America.  In 1954, the Supreme Court case Brown v Board overturned the Plessy v Ferguson ruling that state laws could create separate but equal schools for students of different color. This lead to the betterment in education of blacks, as they started to realize that they were being kept down but were owed the same rights, and treatment. In 1955 martin Luther king jr. became one of the new brave souls who decided to lead the Montgomery bus boycott which was to show how unequal rights were on public transportation.  King later became the head of the civil rights movement which would then lead to his assassination as he became such a big importance. His assassination prompted the US government to act, since a hugely important person to the black community, and civil rights movement, had just been assassinated and it drew their attention to the major problems regarding segregation. The civil rights movement led to the civil rights act of 1964 which outlawed racial discrimination based on “race, color, religion, sex, or national origin”[1].  Even though segregation became outlawed, it took years for it to be fully removed, and till this day continues to be a problem in society.

 

emmit-till

The body of a colored boy Emit Till who was beaten and mutilated until he was no longer recognizable because he spoke to a married white woman. His mother demanded an open casket for the nation to see the unjusts done to her son.

Emmett Till.The body of Emmett Till shown before an open casket funeral.1995. 4×5 in< http://www-tc.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/till/sfeature/images/sf_remember_corpse.jpg> accessed 20 November 2016

trayvon-martin

Trayvon martin was murdered by a white colored man (George Zimmerman) who when tried for murder, got away free because his jury was mostly white. This shows how racism affects the lives of non-white citizens even though they should be equal.

Released to public by family of Trayvon Martin. Lightened photo of Trayvon Martin used in anti-Zimmerman protest rallies, noted as iconic photo. March 17, 2012 4×5 in. < https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TrayvonMartinHooded.jpg> accessed 17 November 2016

freddie-gray

In April 2015 Freddie gray was killed by 6 police officers who believed he had a knife. After his death massive protests came to Baltimore in which thousands of damage was done to the city.

Gray family. Portrait of Freddie Gray. Death of Freddie Gray. 27 April 2015. 4×5 in., <http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/bal-obama-sending-aides-to-freddie-gray-funeral-in-baltimore-20150426-story.html> accessed 17 November 2016

trump

Trump talking about building a wall between Mexico and the USA to keep out illegal immigrants, drug sellers, and criminals. He pushed the USA back to a point of racism that had been slowly fixed by age.

Michael Vadon. Mr Donald Trump New Hampshire Town Hall on August 19th, 2015 at Pinkerton Academy in Derry, NH by Michael Vadon. 4×5 in. 19 August 2015. < https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Donald_Trump_August_19,_2015.jpg> accessed 17 November 2016

king

Martin Luther king giving a speech on his dream and how he wishes that everyone’s children could live together peacefully and be friends instead of segregate.

Martin Luther king jr gives speech on equality. 1964. 4×5 in. <http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-dreier/martin-luther-king-was-a-democratic-socialist_b_9008990.html> accessed 20 November 2016

protest-trump

Protests against trump spread across the country as people disagree with his values having to do with gender equality, and racial equality, and his election as president of the United States.

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march up Fifth Avenue in New York during a protest against the election of President-elect Donald Trump, Nov. 12, 2016. 4×5 in. < http://www.voanews.com/a/more-protests-in-us-cities-against-trumps-election/3593233.html> accessed 20 November 2016

jap-internment

During WWII with the japs, we took them out of their homes and placed them into internment camps for fear that they might be spies, while 99% of them were just peaceful Americans.

Department of the Interior. War Relocation Authority. Japanese American internment notice — 1 April 1942. 11 April 1942. 4×5 in. < https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Posted_Japanese_American_Exclusion_Order.jpg> accessed 20 November 2016

protest-segregation

Blacks protesting segregation in America to make change and desegregate schools for equal education.

Red Rover Camping. Demonstrators picket in front of a school board office in protest of segregation, St Louis, Missouri in the 1960s. 4×5 in. <http://www.redrovercamping.com/blog/2016/02/02/civil-rights-historical-sites-national-parks/> accessed 19 November 2016

obama

In 2008 Obama won the election for president. He became the first black president of the United States. This shows how the USA is moving away from racism and segregation.

The Poynter Institute. President Obama Election 2008: A Collection of Newspaper Front Pages Selected by the Poynter Institute. Color print. <https://www.amazon.com/President-Obama-Election-2008-Collection/dp/0740784803>accessed 17 November 2016.

dan

Recently my fraternity elected a new president. He is of Chinese decent and this shows that the world has changed as many years ago a nonwhite president of a fraternity would be very rare.

fountain-blue

I recently went to a resort, and there was little to no mingling between dark skinned people and whites as seen in the photo where there are no dark skinned people.

xclub

The x club fraternity has not had any black members since its start in 1929. This shows that some organizations continue to be segregated.

trump-sign

This trump pence sign in my fraternity shows how everyone is allowed to have their own opinion, even though we may not like how trump is a racist, and many other things, we must let people believe what they want. This is one reason why segregation and racism may truly never disappear.

 

Through time we are able to see the growth and change of racism and segregation in the United States. Even though times have changed, and people’s lives have improved, segregation and racism continues to be a large problem within today’s society. Nonwhites continue to be oppressed as they continue to be targeted as suspects by the police as shown in the three first photos that show blacks being killed by police, or whites in general. Even though minority leaders are getting elected, and trying to change the world for the better, the people of the world aren’t changing.  Obama was elected in a time of need in the USA because we were going through the 2008 depression, but because of this his ability to make change in the economy and social standings was lowered. Since people thought that he had not accomplished enough, the people of America went for a racist, sexist, billionaire as president because he was white and different from the norm. This election has brought the United States back a generation as racism grows with Trumps campaign and presidency. Even though minorities are now segregated in school with whites, if the minorities live in a poor neighborhood they will be stuck in a school filled with minorities because of the way sections of cities are made. Racism is almost at an all-time high it seems, as with social media is recording and submitting every act of violence that can be seen. Since minorities have become more educated, we see more protests, and are no longer oblivious to how bad the situation is in America for a large amount of minorities.

 

 

Bibliography:

Lois Baldwin, “Desegregation of Public Schools,” The Phylon Quarterly 19 2 (1958): 224-25.

UNKOWN, “Home becomes school for 5 Platt children,” ST-Petersburg Times UNKOWN (December 13, 1954): 4.

Jerrel H Shofner, “The Legacy of Racial Slavery: Free Enterprise and Forced Labor in Florida in the 1940s,” The Journal of Southern History 47 3 (1981): 411-26.

“Transcript of Civil Rights Act.” Our Documents. Accessed November 20, 2016. https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=97&page=transcript#top.

Photo citations:

The Poynter Institute. President Obama Election 2008: A Collection of Newspaper Front Pages Selected by the Poynter Institute. Color print. <https://www.amazon.com/President-Obama-Election-2008-Collection/dp/0740784803>accessed 17 November 2016.

Red Rover Camping. Demonstrators picket in front of a school board office in protest of segregation, St Louis, Missouri in the 1960s. 4×5 in. <http://www.redrovercamping.com/blog/2016/02/02/civil-rights-historical-sites-national-parks/> accessed 19 November 2016

Department of the Interior. War Relocation Authority. Japanese American internment notice — 1 April 1942. 11 April 1942. 4×5 in. < https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Posted_Japanese_American_Exclusion_Order.jpg> accessed 20 November 2016

Demonstrators chant slogans as they march up Fifth Avenue in New York during a protest against the election of President-elect Donald Trump, Nov. 12, 2016. 4×5 in. < http://www.voanews.com/a/more-protests-in-us-cities-against-trumps-election/3593233.html> accessed 20 November 2016

Martin Luther king jr gives speech on equality. 1964. 4×5 in. <http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-dreier/martin-luther-king-was-a-democratic-socialist_b_9008990.html> accessed 20 November 2016

Michael Vadon. Mr Donald Trump New Hampshire Town Hall on August 19th, 2015 at Pinkerton Academy in Derry, NH by Michael Vadon. 4×5 in. 19 August 2015. < https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Donald_Trump_August_19,_2015.jpg> accessed 17 November 2016

Gray family. Portrait of Freddie Gray. Death of Freddie Gray. 27 April 2015. 4×5 in., <http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/bal-obama-sending-aides-to-freddie-gray-funeral-in-baltimore-20150426-story.html> accessed 17 November 2016

Released to public by family of Trayvon Martin. Lightened photo of Trayvon Martin used in anti-Zimmerman protest rallies, noted as iconic photo. March 17, 2012 4×5 in. < https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TrayvonMartinHooded.jpg> accessed 17 November 2016

Emmett Till.The body of Emmett Till shown before an open casket funeral.1995. 4×5 in< http://www-tc.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/till/sfeature/images/sf_remember_corpse.jpg> accessed 20 November 2016

 

[1] “Transcript of Civil Rights Act.” Our Documents. Accessed November 20, 2016. https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=97&page=transcript#top.