Racism and Police Brutality in America

Racism and police brutality go hand in hand.  Racism has long existed within the United States as seen through racial projects such as slavery or the Jim Crow era.  This study looks at data from the National Police Misconduct Statistics and Reporting Project.  This project looks at things such as fatalities, settlements, and misconduct cases, many involving African Americans.  Recent occurrences have led to a negative view of law enforcement because their racist tendencies.

Link to Article:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12111-013-9246-5

Reference:

Chaney, C. & Robertson, R.V. J Afr Am St (2013) 17: 480. https://doi-org.ezproxy.rollins.edu:9443/10.1007/s12111-013-9246-5

 

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Racial Resentment and Attitudes Toward the Use of Force by Police: An Over-Time Trend Analysis.

 

The attitude toward police brutality is widely divided by their attitudes toward minorities. Previous findings support that perceptions toward police brutality toward minorities are racialized. In this article, two interesting results come out: first, whites’ beliefs toward race and racial inequality is highly correlated with their attitudes toward police brutality; second, the correlation between these two factors still constant. Reflecting from this article, we may rethink a new method to improve police brutality.

Reference:

Carter, J. S., & Corra, M. (2016). Racial Resentment and Attitudes Toward the Use of Force by Police: An Over-Time Trend Analysis. Sociological Inquiry, 86(4), 492-511. doi:10.1111/soin.12136

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/soin.12136/abstract

 

 

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Race, Communities and Informers.

Police Brutality not only can be examined by itself, but also can be analyzed with other factors, which is well known as intersectionality theory by Collins. First, the Korryn Gaines’s case is an example of using “intersectionality oppression” in analyzing surveillance and our society.  Second,  “racialization as a way of seeing” concept can explain why African Americans would be connected to crimes by some people. Third, surveillance theory and racial stereotypes can analyze the border patrol’s behaviors in targeting on US-Mexico border immigrants. Fourth, communities also play a role of surveillance by training residents to have “vigilante spirit” to socially excluded groups. By these racial prejudices and mass surveillance toward minorities or “potential terrorists”, minorities are always the victims of police brutality.

Reference:

Browne, S. (2017). Race, Communities and Informers. Surveillance & Society, 15(1), 1-4.

https://ojs.library.queensu.ca/index.php/surveillance-and-society/article/view/race-ed

 

 

 

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Ferguson and the death of Michael Brown on Twitter

Social media is a powerful tool.  This article analyzes millions of tweets regarding Mike Brown and the failure to indict Darren Willson.  Events, especially ones regarding to race, have the ability to create large social movements and that likelihood has only increased with today’s social media.  The #blacklivesmatter was used consistently regarding frequent police shootings of young black men.

Link to Article:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01419870.2017.1335422

Reference:

Rashawn Ray, Melissa Brown, Neil Fraistat & Edward Summers (2017) Ferguson and the death of Michael Brown on Twitter: #BlackLivesMatter, #TCOT, and
the evolution of collective identities, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 40:11, 1797-1813

 

 

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Encyclopedia: Police Brutality

Overall review of police brutality: definition, causes, how to limit this, and debate about violence of police to stop crime.

“Police Brutality” is a comprehensive concept including various aspects: police brutality is a “conscious and venal” act; police brutality is hard to limited by existing law both in the world and in the United States; there is many causes and occasions of police brutality. The article also points out the accountability for and control of police brutality all over the world.  Finally, the article response to the debate whether violence can prevent crimes by giving a resounding “no”.

Reference:

Chevigny, P. G. (2008). Police brutality. In L. R. Kurtz (Ed.), Encyclopedia of violence, peace and conflict (2nd ed.). Oxford, UK: Elsevier Science & Technology. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.rollins.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/estpeace/police_brutality/0?institutionId=4058

 

 

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Outcome of Police brutality: Police Brutality and Black Health: Setting the Agenda for Public Health Scholars

Public Health scholars: How can Police brutality influence health? How can we solve that?

What is the relationships between police brutality and poor health outcomes among Blacks and identified five intersecting pathways? First, fatal injuries that increase population-specific mortality rates;Second, adverse physiological responses that increase morbidity; Third, racist public reactions that cause stress; Fourth, arrests, incarcerations, and legal, medical, and funeral bills that cause financial strain; and fifth, integrated oppressive structures that cause systematic disempowerment. Targeted on these situations, public health scholars are seeking to find more useful data, do more accurate research, and should the responsibility against racist practices in police by suggesting some public policies.

Reference:

Alang, S., McAlpine, D., McCreedy, E., & Hardeman, R. (2017). Police Brutality and Black Health: Setting the Agenda for Public Health Scholars. American Journal Of Public Health, 107(5), 662-665. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.303691

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5388955/

 

 

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