Political Ethics and Social Questions

The Course

Political Ethics and Social Questions

 

About Julia Maskivker

Assistant Professor of Political Science Julia Maskivker’s teaching and research  agenda  focuses  generally  on  analytic  ethical  and  political  philosophy,  and more specifically  on  contemporary  theories  of  justice,  global  ethics,  and  theories  of  social  and economic citizenship.  Further interests include gender and its intersection with social psychology.

Quantitative Reasoning

The Course

Quantitative Reasoning

Covers collection of data and analysis of everyday quantitative information using spreadsheets or statistical packages. Touches upon population vs. sample, parameter vs. statistic, variable type, graphs, measures of center and variation, regression analysis, and hypothesis testing.

Zeynep Teymuroglu

Assistant Professor of Mathematics Zeynep Teymuroglu received her Ph.D. at the University of Cincinnati. Her Ph.D. research was in applied and computational mathematics with an emphasis on mathematical biology. After graduation, she worked as an Associate Manager at the Research and Development department of a market research company. She also has her master’s in mathematics with an emphasis on Financial Mathematics.  Her research interests are mathematical biology, mathematical modeling and financial mathematics. She teaches Calculus, Differential Equations and Applied Mathematics courses.

The Indian Ocean in Antiquity

The Course

The Indian Ocean in Antiquity

The Indian Ocean lies at the crux of the ancient Afro-Asian world. Navigable seaways and monsoon winds channeled people, ideas, and commodities across this vast space over three millennia. Expeditions from New Kingdom Egypt foretell of later Persian, Chinese, Swahili, Portuguese, Dutch, Ottoman, Mughal, and Omani duels of political ambition. Elites and religious pilgrims from the Arabian Peninsula to Southeast Asia sought ideological converts while merchants traded in pepper, pearls, and ivory. Ethiopians and Indians, agents in such contests, led their own states or toiled as slaves or indentured workers in Iraq or Mauritius. All the while, musical, architectural, and philosophical ideas diffused across the region, creating countless variations on aspects of shared heritages. This course introduces the vibrant societies, cosmopolitan cultures, and rich pasts of the Indian Ocean.

About Jonathan Walz

Jonathan R. Walz is an historical archaeologist whose work focuses on East Africa and the Indian Ocean. His articles and commentary on African historical experience, archaeology, heritage, and critical theory have appeared in American Anthropologist, American Antiquity, Historical Archaeology, The African Archaeological Review, and The Journal of Indian Ocean Archaeology, among other publications. He holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Florida and a B.A. with highest honors in Anthropology and African Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As a graduate fellow, he studied African history and Swahili language at the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. Currently, he is an Assistant Professor at Rollins College and a Research Associate at The Field Museum in Chicago.

International Economics

The Course

International Economics

The international economics course provides a presentation of the international economic theory with an emphasis on current applications, issues and policy questions. The course highlights six themes that are widely discussed by the news media: (1) globalization of economic activity; (2) free trade, fair trade, and “quality of life” issues; (3) trade conflicts between developing nations and industrial nations; (4) liberalizing trade- the WTO versus regional trading arrangements; (5) the dollar as a key currency, and (6) the impact of the economic crisis on the world as a whole. The relevance of theory will be demonstrated in the course through real-world economic issues. The material is covered through verbal presentations assisted by graphical methods and media resources, making it highly accessible to students with little economics background.

The Project: The Impact of Fair Trade on Participating Artisans in Africa

The concept of free trade has been at the forefront of U.S. economic policy for many decades and benefited from support through regional trading agreements such as the North American free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with Mexico and Canada. While this has opened up many trading opportunities all over the world, smaller artisans in developing nations seem to have been left out of the positive aspects/impacts involved in free trade agreements. However, there are “trade operations which strengthen the economic position of small-scale producers and landowners in order to ensure that they are not marginalized in the world economy.” This is what the concept of fair trade applies to. It relates mainly to developing countries and covers mainly the following aspects. First, is making sure that producers receive a share of the total profit proportional to their input, and second, refers to improving social conditions for the artisans.

Since its early days after WWII, fair trade has continued to develop and has become a growing phenomenon in the world involving westernized countries such as the United States partaking in fair trade practices with regional organizations in developing nations to provide these producers with fair prices for the goods they provide. While trading between nations can greatly help all parties involved, on occasion small producer get pushed out of their market by bigger corporations that can afford to offer lower prices. Through organizations such as Ten Thousand Villages, artisans in developing nations are now able to promote and sell their goods on the global market while being paid a fair price for their work.  As fair trade itself and fair trade practices gain more importance in todays’ world, as global citizens, we feel that it is imperative to look into its origins, advantages and disadvantages, and to gain a better understanding of this process and how it can affect our lives and those of others in developing countries.

About Anca Voicu

Anca Voicu studied at the Academy of Economic Studies in Bucharest, Romania where she earned her bachelors degree in Economics in 1990 and the University of Birmingham, UK where she earned her PhD degree in Economics in 2000. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Economics at Rollins College, Winter Park, Fl.

Anca Voicu’s teaching has been chiefly in International Economics, European Emerging Markets and Intermediate Macroeconomics. She also taught courses in Principles of Macro- and Microeconomics, Statistics for Economics, Mathematics for Economics, Intermediate Microeconomics, An Economic Analysis of the Great Recession. Anca has a passion for teaching community engagement (CE) courses. Her students in the most recent CE course that she taught partnered up with Ten Thousand Villages and researched on fair trade issues in Africa.

Anca’s research interests include area studies with emphasis on Central and Eastern European economies, trade and trade modeling and forecasting, environmental economics and economic education.

Anca speaks four languages, loves to travel and experience different cultures.

Race and Ethnicity in the United States

The Course

Race and Ethnicity in the United States

Introduction to racial and ethnic identity issues through critical examination of the social, political, and economic factors that helped to construct identity in the United States. Examines how America’s racial and ethnic ideas were created, maintained, and what is at stake when we struggle to define race/ethnic identity.

About Julian C. Chambliss

Julian C. Chambliss is Associate Professor of History at Rollins College where  his teaching and research focus on urban history and culture in the United States.  He serves as coordinator of the Africa and African-American Studies Program at Rollins, Coordinator of the Media Arts and Culture Special Interest Section for the Florida Conference of Historians and as a board member of the Society for American City and Regional Planning History.

(Final Paper and PowerPoint) The Dragon Fleet and Chinese Cosmopolitanism or Lack Thereof

Introduction to the Dragon Fleet
By Jennifer Ritter

(Final PowerPoint) A look at the seven  tribute  voyages of Zheng  He  under  the   command  of Emperor  Yongle.
Click here to view the Powerpoint presentation.

(Final Paper) The Dragon Fleet and Chinese Cosmopolitanism or Lack Thereof
By Jennifer Ritter

A preponderance of research has been conducted on the seven voyages of imperial eunuch Zheng He during the Ming dynasty. He commanded a massive armada, the largest navy that the world had ever seen. The fleet remained surpassed until WWI. Traveling throughout the Indian Ocean, his fleet touched down in at least thirty countries. Some resisted these foreign intruders, but most recognized the navy␣␣ power and submitted to Chinese authority. One recurring question is whether or not China in this era subscribed to cosmopolitanism. The voyages of the Dragon Fleet did not openly increase cosmopolitanism in China; however, they did provide syncretization opportunities for overseas Chinese and non-Chinese foreigners.

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