Category: Religion

Religion in the New State of Virginia

Religion in Colonial Virginia was largely Anglican. It was, by law, supported with taxes until October 1776 when the “Ten-thousand Name” petition (by Dissenters, Baptists and Baptist sympathizers) were able to end the established Anglican church. The battle for institutionalization of religious…

Massachusetts Religion

The Massachusetts Declaration of Rights of 1780 states “It is the right as well as the duty of all men in society, publicly, and at stated season, to worship the Supreme Being”. This means citizens of Massachusetts have a duty…

New Hampshire and Religion

The dominant religion in New Hampshire during the 1780’s was Protestant. New Hampshire didn’t have many laws against religious freedoms of its citizens expect when electing people to office such as the senate and House of Representatives. The New Hampshire…

Religion in South Carolina

America was founded on religion, and the same currents that encouraged the Puritans to flee their homeland to escape persecution ran through the Revolution and into the states and their constitutions. The Crown imposed the imperialistic Church of England on…

Maryland Religion

  Catholics Maryland was originally founded solely as a haven for Catholics. Lord Baltimore was the man who established Maryland as a Catholic colony but was faced with many troubles for doing so. At one point he had his land…

North Carolina – Religion

In Colonial times, Britain attempted to make the Church of England a strong presence in the colonies, but the colonists held a strong resentment against paying for the church with their tax dollars.  As such, the popularity of the Anglican…

Religion in Colonial Georgia

Georgia was founded by James Oglethorpe as a refuge for criminals. Along with criminals, in the early colonial times, Jews found refuge in the colony. The main church in colonial Georgia was the Anglican Church. The church constituted the most…

New York: Religion

New York: Religion The state of New York’s Constitution defined a separation between church and state. This allowed for the citizens of New York to freely practice their own religion without any form of persecution or discrimination. After the Revolutionary…

The Massachusetts Declaration of Rights written in 1780 states “It is the right as well as the duty of all men in society, publicly, and at stated season, to worship the Supreme Being”. This means citizens of Massachusetts had a…