New York and the Federal Constitution

The Constitution of the United States of America

 

New York and the Ratification of the Constitution

July 26th, 1788 marked a historical day for the state of New York. On this very day, New York became the eleventh state to formally adopt and ratify the Constitution of the United States. Many say that the state was influenced by Virginia’s ratification of the Constitution, because it was the state to do so right before it. Although it was not needed for the states to formally adopt the Constitution since they only needed nine out of the thirteen states, the state still proceeded to ratify, anyways. The delegates of the state of New York met and “duly” elected to ratify the constitution. There was not too much agreement state-wise, but the plans to ratify still fell through. By doing so, the state of New York vested more power in the people. The people finally had more of a say in the government and in all governmental actions thanks to the ratification of this constitution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

“Constitution of the United States – Page 1.” The Charters of Freedom. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2012.

“Constitution of the United States – Page 2.” The Charters of Freedom. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2012.

“Constitution of the United States – Page 3.” The Charters of Freedom. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2012.

“Constitution of the United States – Page 4.” The Charters of Freedom. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2012.

Mount, Steve, and Craig Walenta. “New York’s Ratification.” The U.S. Constitution.

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