‘Easy A’ Loves the 80s

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The 2010 teenage comedy, Easy A, is a happy-go-lucky romantic comedy about a high school teenager played by Emma Stone, who’s an innocent girl that uses her school’s rumor mill to make a name for herself. The film is designed to take after the famous novel, The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, because Emma Stone commits fake acts of adultery to gain popularity and status, but instead she gains an awful reputation.
Notably, this film is partially known for all of its famous 1980s movie references. The main character, Olive, creates these web diaries in which she shares information about all her exploits. One web diary in particular features her referencing all the great ’80s movies about romance, in which she opens with, “Whatever happened to chivalry? Does it only exist in ’80s movies?”
Here’s that web diary:
All these iconic ’80s movie references, in order are:
Say Anything, 1989

Say Anything, 1989

Can't Buy Me Love, 1987

Can’t Buy Me Love, 1987

Sixteen Candles, 1984

Sixteen Candles, 1984

The Breakfast Club, 1985

The Breakfast Club, 1985

And finally, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, 1986

And finally, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, 1986

Another subtle reference to an ’80s film occurs when the main character, Olive is sharing a moment with her love interest Todd. He lets her know he has fallen with her and over the radio we hear a Cary Brothers cover of the famous ’80s song “If You Were Here,” originally by Thompson Twins. This song is actually the song playing when Jake Ryan and Sam share their first kiss in Sixteen Candles!

Here’s the original song:
In the end of the film, Olive Pendergast does, in fact, get her perfect ’80s movie ending! We get 3 of those ’80s movie references again in this scene alone- Breakfast Club’s “Don’t You Forget About Me” is playing on the speakers Todd is holding over his head (Say Anything) and he even takes her on a lawnmower ride like in Can’t Buy Me Love. What a guy.
Here’s that final sequence:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKLX5Xfvte4
You’re welcome.

Things Kids from the 80s Can Only Remember

The Muppet Babies….I do not know… Apparently people argue that they were better than Arthur. I would have to disagree.

That Muppet Babies is greatest cartoon of all time (sorry, Rugrats ).

He-Man and She-Ra. They are brother and sister but people thought they were sucha hot couple together….interesting.

Even though they were brother and sister, you thought He-Man and She-Ra made a hot couple.

Th Cosby Show. One of the best TV shows ever. This one is not all about the 80s kids. I think many people know this one. Great great show!

"Must-see TV" meant The Cosby Show .

This one is very sad. But remembering where you were when the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded. This is very similar to the explosion of the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 1st, 2003 when it exploded on re-entry.

Remembering where you were when the Challenger disaster happened.

The caption where is got this picture of the Breakfast Club, reads, “Trying to be as cool as the teens in John Hughes Movies.” Right on with this one. John Hughes movies, especially teen movies were great, really entertaining. I would be lying if I said I did not have interest in watching more of his films.

Aspiring to one day be as cool as the teens in John Hughes movies.

Pop Star movement. yup, defiantly do not remember this. Probably would not have taken notice or part of it anyways. Haha

Being either "Team Cyndi" or "Team Madonna."

The original Transformers Movie. So apparently Optimus Prime dies in this movie. Yeah I feel bad for the kids in the 80s who had to see this. He is such a boss. He saves the day in all the transformer movies nowadays! Cannot believe he died in this movie!

The emotional blow you felt when Optimus Prime died in The Transformers: The Movie .

The collecting of Garbage Pail Kids….what? I think it is a good thing that this only lasted for a short time in the 80s…

The joy of collecting Garbage Pail Kids and putting the stickers on your bedroom wall.

Hahaha this one made me laugh. I think this personifies the 80s for kids today and what our perception is. When i think of the 80s, I think of neon colors and outfits that make you stand out. Well, here it is. the neon biker or leggings that girls wore to school.

That it’s perfectly acceptable to wear neon spandex biker shorts with just a T-shirt to school.

Continuing the trend of 80s clothing, the pegs on your jeans. A staple in the 80s and still is today for kids who try to replicate that.

Taking that little extra time in the morning to get the perfect peg on your jeans.

 

Hiyao Miyazaki in the 1980s

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Hiyao Miazaki has maintained an influential career as a film director, animator, manga artist, illustrator and producer across six decades. His skills and success have earned him comparison to Walt Disney, Nick Park and Steven Spielberg. Alongside  Isao Takahata, Hiyao Miazaki co-founded Studio Ghibli (April 1985), his film and animation studio. Through his talent and animation studio he has become one of the most famous and influential of all animators (and my personal favorite). Today, I will be looking at some of his works that he did during the 1980s — A time period that resulted in several of his greatest works.

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984)

This film is considered one of his greatest works by many. It paved the way for the themes which appear in many of his films such as concern for the environmental, aviation and anti-military messages. It also is considered a precursor for another one of his greatest films, Princess Mononoke. Also, it is important to point out the almost dream-like images that appear in all of his films as a result of the peculiar creatures and fantastical occurrences.

Laputa: Castle in the Sky (1986)

This is his first film that he made with Studio Ghibli. It is focused around two orphans who go on a magical journey to Laputa, a magical land in the sky, in search of their parents. Once again this brings into play his fascination with flight which is intertwined into an incredible mythical story line.

My Neighbor Totoro (1988)

In My Neighbor Totoro, two little girls move to a new home and befriend the forest spirits. This is another very famous film of Hayao Miyazaki. Many of the images from this movie have become iconic Such as this one where the little girls are waiting with the forrest spirit at the bus stop:

Kiki´s Delivery Service (1989)

Finally, this was the last of the 1980s films that Hiyao Miyazaki produced and my personal favorite as a child. This is the enchanting story of Kiki, a young, charming witch finding her place in the big city.

 

What makes all of these films so wonderful is the fanciful aspect to them. Anything can happen in a Hiyao Miyazaki film. Also, they are just so beautifully animated that is impossible not to enjoy them just on the basis of the artwork alone. In a variety of ways, Hiyao Miyakazki is one of the most brilliant film makers of not just the 1980s, but in history as well.

 

 

Cocaine in the 80’s

So far cocaine has been featured in nearly every movie we’ve watched with the exception of the teen movies, and to be hones when I think of 80’s movies its hard to block out the image of Scarface sitting with face down in a gigantic white pile of powder. So I guess the question is: how rampant was cocaine use in the 80’s?

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According to this rehab website, cocaine was the “most popular recreational drug in the 80’s”. The article even claims that cocaine usage was more rampant than alcohol use. That is a pretty hard core claim. The movies of the 1980s certainly seem to portray cocaine as a drug of the beautiful and the rich. What may be more relevant is the massive amount of modern movies that portray the late 70’s and early 80’s as a mecca of cocaine amidst a disco glamor backdrop. Movies like 54 which portrayed the famous nightclub in its heyday and Blow, a hard luck story about a cocaine smuggler portray a decade where drugs were everywhere: at every party, in every nightclub, and in a vial in the pocket of every Hollywood starlet.

One of the best examples of cocaine use amongst Hollywood youth is that of Drew Barrymore darling of the movie E.T who went to rehab at the ripe old age of 14 for cocaine usage and was often reported to be spotted in the popular nightclubs of the 80’s like Studio 54 snorting cocaine and smoking cigarettes.

coca drewdrew coca

We see cocaine use in 80’s movies like Wall Street where it is just part of the new world of making money. There are articles like this one where Dennis Quaid claims that cocaine was an expense built into movie budgets.

It seems coke was to the 19080s what pot was to the hippies of sixties and seventies, and nowhere is that better portrayed than in the films and social scene of Hollywood.